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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
venue. the queen mary, of course. [laughter] let's begin. it's dawn on inauguration day in washington d.c. a huge amount of people gathered on the washington mall. 2009 it was all away from the capital of a way to the lincoln memorial. we just lost our picture. there we go. and they are there, of course, for the inauguration. people gathered to watch in other places as well. in times square in new york city, classrooms around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot
's begin. it's dawn on inauguration day in washington, d.c. to be a huge amount of people gather on the washington mall. in 2009 was all the way from the capitol all the way to the lincoln memorial. we just lost our picture. there we go. and there of course for the inauguration. people gather to watch and other places as well. in a times square in new york city and in classrooms around the country in paris and iraq, in afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there. there is a big crowd on the mall. ayaan going to speak to you today about this great historic subject, this great american institution. and i am going to do it in the same way in which i organized the book. the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also
'm not going to say it. >> you are in our hearts. you can tell us what's going on in washington. what's going on in washington? >> bad dynamics. >> really? >> those of us optimistic there'd be a deal. the white house has blasted boehner's offer as much as the republicans blasted the president's. people like to say, oh, they're going to posture, but behind the scenes they're working it out. they're not. >> i hear chuck todd reported yesterday behind the scenes a top aide to barack obama, willie geist. and this -- i don't -- i'm not really good at reading the tea leaves. maybe this is good, maybe this is bad. but a top obama aide yesterday told chuck todd that if the republicans -- if these republicans were in power when abraham lincoln were there, there would still be slavery. does that help the process move along? or does it hurt? i don't really know -- >> reading between the lines. >> i know one direction, i know boy bands. >> reading between the lines, that's probably a bad omen. we do have four weeks, though. >> that's bad. >> absolutely. we have, i believe, we have 27 negotiating days. un
keeps coming to mind as i try to follow the melodrama in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as santa to leave in your stocking. bruce bartlett was an economic adviser to the supply-side icon jack kemp, and to two presidents -- ronald reagan and the first george bush. he got into hot water with his conservative cohorts when he wrote a widely quoted book critical of the second president bush. his most recent work is "the benefit and the burden: tax reform-why we need it and what it will take." yves smith is the founder and editor of the popular blog naked capitalism. after 25 years in the financial services industry, she now heads the management consulting firm aurora advisors. she's the author of this book: "econned: how unenlightened self interest undermined democracy and corrupted capitalism." welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> is the fiscal cliff just a metaphor? or is it for real? >> well, the cliff is
here in washington. it is a heated rivalry. >> bill: even if your team loses, don't you think you would wear the gear? >> i have the hat. i am absolutely loyal. they played a solid game last night. right up until they didn't win. >> they almost won. >> spoken like a true fan. they played a great game until they lost. >> bill: here's what it sounded like on espn right at the end there. >> rejuvenated football in the nation's capital. redskins and giants split. it looks like they've won a game here at fedex field. and all they are is within a game of the division lead. >> bill: 17-16. >> i will say as a giants fan the redskins are a solid contender this year and they have a fabulous rookie quarterback. >> bill: rgiii. >> he's very good. >> bill: there we go. we've got the nats and redskins coming up. whoa suddenly, sports town. >> i wouldn't get too carried away with that. the last couple of games they looked very good. they also lost to the panthers this season and they had some very terrible games. if th
see already, there is a different tone in washington. i think elections matter. the voters spoke. even though the race was relatively close, it was not that close in the electoral college. even the margin has expanded now to 4 million votes. i think people read those results. i think, for example, on an issue like immigration reform, the prospects for passing comprehensive immigration reform in the near future -- near future are much greater than they were three weeks ago because of the result of the election. i think the chance of coming to an agreement on this fiscal cliff are greater today because of this election. politicians read election results. i do not know whether our campaign or their campaign fostered the environment for that. i think the voters did, and that is as it should be. >> the last couple questions -- we will come back to this side. >> my question is, in the days following the election there was a fair amount of coverage about the divisiveness of the obama for america ground game -- i was wondering, how you need you think that model was for this campaign and candid
later in the program interviewing dan savage. it's about dan's marriage in washington state. they are one of the couples getting married there. after voters extended marriage rights to same-sex couples by popular vote last month. we have david johnston, the author of "fine print." he's a pulitzer prize winning tax writer at new york times and now at the college of law. we have the president and ceo of the center of american progress who served in the obama and clinton administrations, policy director of hillary clinton's campaign. laura flanders, founder of grittv.com. the editor of salon.com and the woman who hired me two years ago. thanks, as always for that. >> of course. >> anyway, on friday afternoon, house speaker john boehner attempted to paint a picture of white house negotiations and how to avoid going over the fiscal curve. i have been saying fiscal slope. now on the show, i'll go with curve. >> this isn't a progress report because there's no progress to report. four days ago, we offered a serious proposal based on testimony from president clinton's former chief of
was that our supporters would read this and it would spend -- especially in washington, the world's biggest record chamber -- people would get nervous and worried. when those things happen, you find everyone very generous with their advice. [laughter] the frustration was less than we be worried about where we were but other people's behavior and that it would create a disillusionment among supporters. so we spent a lot of the campaign fighting back against some of these polls. what was remarkable about this race, as looking of the data that we had, it was not how volatile it was, but how steady it was. from february through november, we were running in our own data generally a two-point to 4-point lead. we never fell behind. there was a time in september, after the conventions, we had a strong convention and they had not so strong convention, and came the famous 47% tape. we got a six-point or seven- point battleground states lead. some republican leaning voters moved away from romney. and then can the first debate, which we strategically planned a little suspense for. [laughter] >> there w
. >> as we wait for word of the deal, lawmakers in washington are under close scrutiny. that is because the alternative will impact almost every american. we are joined by nikole killion, who is live in washington to explain. >> some analysts say this is more of fiscal slope rather than a cliff, since the effects would be gradual, rather than a straight free fall. either way, it could be a long way down. >> higher taxes in 2013. >> 2013, taxes go up. >> several tax breaks expire and the tax policy center estimates the average household would face a tax hike of almost $3,500 in the new year. >> that means less money to buy groceries and pay the bills. >> consequence number two, delayed refunds. >> as many as 1 million taxpayers may get their money back late without a fix to the alternative minimum tax. consequence number three, automatic spending cuts. about $110 billion has to be slashed from the budgets across the board. >> the secretary of defense says it will decimate our ability to defend this nation. >> consequence number four, jobless benefits end. that have been extended before,
? is there a singular documentary film, television show, which stands out to you? >> "mr. smith goes to washington." no matter what your politics are, i cannot imagine anyone watching that film not being somehow moved to have a voice. to be able to put a voice to experience and your point of view. i suppose that gets me every time. >> good choice. >> mine was "it's a wonderful life." it was a snapshot of an imagined america. to the extent that was a window to the rest of the world, people at their best. >> my reaction was "saturday night live." i love politics, i love the sport of politics. i like satire. >> i am going to cheat and say "12 angry men." >> all of holland came to a stop at 7:00 on monday night. thank you very much. >> cinematic columnist george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then it james taylor -- james taylor in his recent appearance at the national press club. later, the life of senator robert byrd. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i came down edl was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i went to work for john lindsay, but i would not work f
, which stands out to you? >> "mr. smith goes to washington." no matter what your politics are, i cannot imagine anyone watching that film not being somehow moved to have a voice. to be able to put a voice to experience and your point of view. i suppose that gets me every time. >> good choice. >> mine was "it's a wonderful life." it was a snapshot of an imagined america. but maybe in america that was also at its best. to the extent that was a window to the rest of the world, people at their best. >> david? >> my reaction was "saturday night live." [laughter] i love politics, i love the sport of politics. i find it fascinating. between saturday night live in jon stewart, -- and jon stewart,i like satire. >> i am going to cheat and say "12 angry men." >> all of holland came to a stop at 7:00 on monday night. peyton place. >> really? >> thank you very much. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> coming up on c-span -- talks about the judicial system with supreme court justices stephen briar and anthony kennedy. and
. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors and please chiefs. we have never, to my knowledge, had anybody who has ever created, let alone starred in movies or tv series until tonight. and we have michael lynn on the to thank for that. mike sl co-
of the founders of this institution the administration of washington was using the recession and the ongoing depression as the pretext to turn the american public against a free enterprise system and was doing so with the tools of class warfare half. this sounds remarkably similar to today and was the belief of our founders that unless something changed, something big was going to happen and something bad, the american economy and indeed to the american society. as we all know, something was about to happen in 1938 and we certainly hope something like that isn't about to happen today. we will get a view of tonight's speaker about what the next great revolution will look like in american politics. jim as i said is the president of the science foundation and he's written and edited books for many years on policy and politics. he's been a leading voice in the conservative intellectual movement and a central figure in before lamb preppie in higher education. we are honored to have him here. jim piereson. [applause] >> thanks very much, arthur. it's a great pleasure to be back at aei to renew a f
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)